The GPF site may be down briefly sometime this weekend for planned maintenance. During this upgrade, the entire server will be unavailable and will not respond to requests. We don't know yet how long this outage window will take, but it shouldn't last more than an hour at most. We apologize for any inconvenience.

About GPF

Last updated February 15, 2012

General Protection Fault started as an accidental doodle while sitting in a cubicle in a large information technology company. Needless to say, it was corrupted with geekiness from the beginning.

Since that time, it has grown into a bizarre, humorous, and entertaining adventure with little signs of slowing down. Filled with intelligent humor, zany parodies, obscure jabs, and sentient slime molds, GPF is one of the most unique comic strips on the Web. It is unique not because of the technical aspects of the strip (i.e., its "geekiness"), but in that it focuses on the relationships and characterization of the cast, and on the adventures that face the every day. Mind you, those adventures and characters are far from normal, but what would you expect from a comic born within the eddies of cyberspace?

GPF currently updates three days per week on Mondays, Wednesdays, and Fridays. Historically, its updates were much more frequent, updating daily for nearly eight years, sometimes in full color. Thus, there's a tremendous wealth of archives to explore. There have been several GPF books in print, spreading the humorous word without the aid of an Internet connection. Anyone wishing to discuss syndication rights can check out our syndication info page for more information.

Jeff Darlington crash-landed on the planet Earth near Beckley, WV, USA, in May of 1974. Adopted by a kind, loving couple, he was raised into human society and treated as one of their own, despite his occasional tendency to drink Drano. While excelling in education and amazing his instructors, he never could seem to get himself a date. He graduated from high school in 1992 and was accepted at West Virginia University Institute of Technology, determined to become a chemical engineer. Two years later, he realized that chemical engineering wasn't his calling (and he didn't want to make vast quantities of ammonia for the rest of his life), so he changed his major to computer science and graduated in 1997. He was quickly hired by IBM Global Services, despite his annoying lack of ability to do anything productive. In June of 1998, he married his one and only love, his beloved Keri. They have one son, Benjamin, who was born in mid-2006. Jeff currently works for ManTech International developing Web-based applications and computer-based training for various United States Department of Defense clients, including the U.S. Navy Reserve, Navy, Army, and Defense Logistics Agency.

Jeff began drawing at an early age, scrawling demented stick figures on church bulletins and any other spare piece of paper. In 1985, he created his first original comic book character, which he plans to publish... eventually. Currently, the closets in both his parents' house and his own home are filled with several forests worth of sketches and drawings, each of which he claims he will "finally do something with that some day." He has no formal art training aside from classes taken in high school, but somehow still thinks that he has something worth giving to the world. General Protection Fault is his first official attempt at publishing. Jeff has created several other web sites over the years, the most notorious (after GPF) being Apocalypse Pete's Web Page of Mirth and Mayhem!, which has sadly passed on into the cyberether voids, and his personal blog, Neural Core Dump.

And for the record, this Jeff is not the same Jeff Darlington working as a sportswriter for the NFL. This is the Jeff Darlington who draws geeky comics on the Internet. Our Jeff tends to work professionally as "Jeffrey T. Darlington", which is a bit more of a mouthful but a tiny bit more distinguishing. That said, we do like his parents' choice in names....

Note: Any opinions expressed on this site are the opinions of Jeff Darlington, and not necessarily the opinions expressed by his current employer. This site is in no way affiliated with Jeff's employer in any fashion.